9 Winnie-the-Pooh Quotes Every Writer Must Trust

20130910-173747.jpg The problem with dreaming REALLY BIG dreams is being constantly reminded that you and your dreams are, in fact, quite small. Nearly invisible to the average eye. At least, that’s how it feels sometimes. Especially in the world of Twitter, where we have to hunt like dogs to recruit followers. I only have 36. Lame, I know. Meanwhile, the dreams of those whom we follow are currently coming true, or came true a long time ago. Those people are just maintaining their dream, keeping us hooked so that we’ll keep their dream thriving. Which we do (because we’re nice, or because we hope our engaging with them will somehow help our own dream), but we’re constantly wondering, when will it be my turn?

We artists are wired with a grand emotional spectrum; one that occasionally requires a great big hug and some kind words from an old friend. Like Winnie-the-Pooh. Thanks to the Great Golden One, we “creatives” can write through any ugly, frustrating storm (eg. writer’s block, rejection, Twitter), to eventually see our dreams shine like a rainbow once again.

So I share these insightful quotes with you, dear writer friends, in hopes that you too will stay motivated and continue to Write On!

Pooh’s advice for picture books is a no-brainer in the writing community (today’s picture books are expected to be 500 words or less), but he doled them out long ago, and they are still relevant to this day:

1) “It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like ‘What about lunch?'”

In the face of Writer’s Block, you must:

2) “Think, think, think.”

Much like Pooh, a writer must strengthen his creative muscle through reading and writing:

3) “A bear, however hard he tries, grows tubby without exercise.”

When Writer’s Block strikes yet again, it helps to:

4) “Think it over, think it under.”

Even Pooh knows the importance of proof-reading and editing:

5) “My spelling is Wobbly. It’s good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.”

In a world where a million other writers are vying for an audience, you are a single digit. But that is no reason to give up. Even if no one else understands, Pooh does:

6) “It is hard to be brave, when you’re only a Very Small Animal.”

Even Pooh knows better than to dwell on backstory and info-dumps:

7) “So perhaps the best thing to do is to stop writing Introductions and get on with the book.”

When your book is finally published, will people like it? Pooh says maybe, maybe not. But you will never know unless you try:

8) “When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.”

Pooh’s most important advice is to not lose hope. Simply flow with the course of your life, and at some point, someday, you will reach your dream destination:

9) “Rivers know this: there is no hurry. We shall get there someday.”

Happy Writing.